Health Blog

Let’s get cooking…healthy, hot weather meals…5-29-18

Posted by on May 29, 2018 in Health Blog | 0 comments

Let’s get cooking…healthy, hot weather meals…5-29-18

 

It’s hot outside!  I love the heat and 89 sunny degrees doesn’t phase me, but others may not be so happy.  When it’s this warm outside our meal choices tend to be lighter fare and by default, can be healthier!

Don’t fall in the too warm weather trap of buying pre-made foods in the frozen foods section to avoid cooking your meals.  They may be convenient but are they healthy?  With all those additives, colors, preservatives and who knows what else you can’t pronounce, doesn’t making your own fresh foods sound tastier?

We still want to eat our balance of complex carbs, protein and healthy fats daily.  My ratios are 50/25/25.  Yours might be different but we can all start with some fresh foods.

Now’s the time to start experimenting with salads!  Head out to your local farmer’s market on the weekend, check out the link in my previous bloghttps://www.localharvest.org/farmers-markets/    As a vegetarian, I love this time of year!  You’ve got some great choices for fruits and veggies and whole grain breads!

Breakfast, lunch and dinner can be made up of fruits and veggies.  A breakfast salad can contain your fave greens, fruits and a sprinkle of your fave nut. Drizzle with honey or pure maple syrup and you’re ready to eat!  A lunch or dinner salads can be your fave greens, veggies raw or lightly steamed (less than 3 minutes) with a splash of olive oil and or your fave vinegar.  If you eat dairy products, toss in some chopped cheese.  Or just have the veggies, raw, lightly steamed  or both!  Grab some whole grain breads or tortillas and drizzle some olive oil and pile on your faves.  Dessert can be fresh fruits with some chopped mint and a splash of citrus juice.

Warm weather cooking can be easier than you think with a few changes to your usual meals.  Questions?  Contact me to set up a coaching sessions  or a pantry makeover/smart shopping program.  I’ve got a raw foods recipe/cooking certification and recipes to share!

Enjoy the warmer weather, be sure to hydrate and eat fresh!

 

*Disclaimer:

This information is solely for informational purposes.  IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE.  Kim Gerhardt, Certified Health Coach, does not take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of  medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information.  The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.

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Let’s Get Cookin….Spaghetti Squash, its good…5/21/18

Posted by on May 21, 2018 in Health Blog | 0 comments

Let’s Get Cookin….Spaghetti Squash, its good…5/21/18

One of my lifelong favorites in the squash family is the spaghetti squash. I’ve been making it since the 80’s!

As a vegetarian, I’ve got to find foods that taste great, are nutrient dense  and fill me up as well.  Spaghetti squash is one of those foods.  It looks like strands of spaghetti and you can prepare it any way you want and feel like you are eating spaghetti.

Let’s start off with it’s nutrient bio.

  • “Its flesh along with its strands contains a good amounts of dietary fiber. This roughage binds to cancer-causing toxins and chemicals in the colon and thereby protecting its mucosa from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), cancers, and diverticulitis. Also, it helps reduce fat absorption and blood LDL-cholesterol levels.
  • It carries anti-oxidant vitamins such as vitamin-A, vitamin-C, and carotenes in small amounts on comparison to pumpkins. Vitamin-A is a powerful natural antioxidant and is required by the body for maintaining the integrity of skin and mucosa. It is also an essential vitamin for healthy eyesight. Research studies suggest that natural foods rich in vitamin-A may help the human body protect against lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • The squash boasts higher source of the B-complex group of vitamins like folates, niacin, vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine), than in pumpkins.

It is also a modest source of minerals like zinc, copper, calcium, and phosphorus.”   And you can eat the seeds!

Besides being so healthy, spaghetti squash is like a blank canvas of food!  I  like to serve it with steamed veggies and sauteed onion and garlic.  Add some of your favorite hard cheese and you’re ready to eat!  If you like tomato sauce, top it with and some large sauteed mushroom.  The possibilities are really endless!

Here’s how I cook spaghetti squash:

Cut it in half and remove the seeds. If you want to roast the seeds, clean and place on a small baking sheet with some olive oil, salt and pepper or spices. Bake at 400 for 10-15 minutes till just done!

Place the spaghetti squash on a baking sheet and heat up your oven to 400 degrees.  I brush with olive oil and a sprinkle of ground Himalayan pink salt and fresh cracked black pepper. Bake for one hour, shred with a fork to get the strands and go!  FYI I bake all my squashes the same at 400 degrees for an hour. I cut them in half, remove the seeds and that’s it!

If you’d like to start eating healthier but not sure where to begin, let’s set up a pantry makeover/smart shopping program here https://kimgerhardt.com/event/pantry-makeover-smart-shopping-sessions/.  Contact me today!  Cheers!

https://www.nutrition-and-you.com/spaghetti-squash.html

*Disclaimer:

This information is solely for informational purposes.  IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE.  Kim Gerhardt, Certified Health Coach, does not take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of  medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information.  The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.

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Let’s Get Cookin! Raw foods, fun or frustrating? 5/8/18

Posted by on May 8, 2018 in Health Blog | 0 comments

Let’s Get Cookin! Raw foods, fun or frustrating?  5/8/18

 

Raw foods.  A trend in healthy eating that’s becoming more and more popular.

The simplest example I can give you is a salad.  Grab your favorite greens and raw veggies add some fresh dressing and you’re ready!

Let’s break down what a raw foods diet is and it’s health benefits.

A raw foods diet is comprised of mostly uncooked fruits and vegetables that have not experienced an internal temperature of 107 degrees or more.  All whole, unprocessed foods contain the nutrients for that food unaltered and are of the maximum use to our bodies.  What’s the perfect raw foods diet?  Lotsa fresh fruits and veggies daily.  Add in some nuts, seeds and sprouted grains for additional benefits!

So why raw foods?  Good question!  Some of the benefits may be to lose weight, help with a health related issue, improve your skin appearance, aid digestion and the possible reduction of diseases such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease and more.  Most raw foods do not contain unhealthy fats as do many of the processed and cooked fast, junk foods. You may want to eat raw foods ethically for the animals or to save our planet!

Here’s an interesting thought from https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/benefits-of-raw-food-diet/ “Universally it seems that most cells in nature start to malfunction and die at a temperature above 106 degrees, even our own body cells suffer greatly at a body temperature above 106 and by the time it reaches about 108 degrees its goodbye. There is not much wiggle room between life and death here”.

When foods are cooked some of the nutrients within the food are destroyed.  Raw foods are  nutrient dense and contain plant phytochemicals which may help with disease prevention.

Be aware that toxins can occur in non-organic raw foods from pesticides.  Organic and locally grown foods are great options to try.  Check out your local farmer’s markets!

As always do your research and contact your healthcare provider before making any dietary changes.

As a Certified Personal Fitness Chef and in Raw Foods Recipes and cooking, I combine both to teach you how incorporated healthier food choices into your lifestyle.  Contact me for more info!

Here’s my simple raw food salad:

2-3 leaves of your favorite greens, washed and torn into bite sized pieces

1/2 tomato cut into small dice

3 slices of cucumber-1/4 inch, peels on, or cut into a dice

a shredded half carrot washed but not peeled

one or two slices of your favorite peppers

a splash of olive oil, balsamic vinegar or lemon juice (about 2 teaspoons)

Himalayan pink salt and pepper to taste!

Enjoy!   Serves 1

https://rawfoodcentral.com/pages/what-is-considered-raw-vegan

https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/benefits-of-raw-food-diet/

*Disclaimer-This information is solely for informational purposes.  IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE.  Kim Gerhardt, Certified Health Coach, does not take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of  medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information.  The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.

 

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Let’s Get Cookin – Whole grains, love or hate? 4-30-18

Posted by on Apr 30, 2018 in Health Blog | 0 comments

Let’s Get Cookin – Whole grains, love or hate?  4-30-18

Whole grains. They seem to run either  hot or cold with most people.  Yes they are what has become the dreaded “carbs”.  But they are the good carbs.  Let’s see what whole grains have to offer.

Whole grains are a complex carb.  Okay, you say what exactly is that?  Well here we go.  There are two types of carbohydrates, simple and complex.

Simple carbohydrates are broken down quickly by your body—they give you a quick energy “high” but you can crash soon after craving more.  Examples of simple carbs are sugar, white bread, white rice, white pasta, pastries and candy.

Complex carbohydrates have more nutrients and take longer for your body to digest, so they make you feel full and don’t cause the same blood sugar swings as a simple carb.  Some examples of complex carbs are whole grains, beans, fruits and vegetables, including both sweet and Idaho potatoes.  Complex carbs also contain dietary fiber which helps with elimation of foods from the body and keeping you regular!

Look at this way, simple carbs need to be used up immediately or the body has no use for them so it stores them as fat; mostly in the liver and belly.  Not a good thing. The body uses complex carbs to help with body functions including brain health.  They work within the body to help out and are eliminated when not necessary.  Complex carbs can keep you satisfied and not craving those sugary simple carbs. They have built in weight control!

If you’d like to find out more info on complex carbs and how a more plant based diet may fit into your healthy lifestyle, contact me today!  Let’s set up a free consultation and put your best program together today.  See ya next time!  🙂

http://www.eatingwell.com/article/290631/what-is-a-complex-carbohydrate/

 

 

 

*Disclaimer-This information is solely for informational purposes.  IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE.  Kim Gerhardt, Certified Health Coach, does not take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of  medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information.  The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.

 

 

 

 

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Let’s Get Cooking – Grab some greens -4-18-18

Posted by on Apr 19, 2018 in Health Blog | 0 comments

Let’s Get Cooking – Grab some greens -4-18-18

What’s green in season during early spring?

What’s your favorite green?  Not the color but the food!  Spring gives us quite a few choices such as collards, fiddlehead ferns, butter lettuce, red leaf lettuce, spinach, baby lettuce swiss chard and watercress!

Greens are not only pretty to look at and delicious, but they are nutrient dense! Mustard greens and kale may lower cholesterol levels.  Dandelion greens swiss chard, kale and mustard greens contain the cartenoids lutein and zeaxanthin which may help filter high energy light which can damage your eyes.

Greens are an easy addition to your morning shake for some fresh plant fiber.  They make a great addition to your veggie sandwiches and are delicious when steamed or sauteed with a bit of olive oil and garlic.

One of my favorite greens are collards.  Collard greens contain folate, vitamin A, B comples, C, K-which may help by limiting neuron damage in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients.  They also contain adequate amounts of minerals like iron, calcium, copper, manganese, selenium and zinc.

If you can find your favorite fresh greens grab them.  If not, why try some new greens!  You may have a new fave food.  I prefer fresh always, but if it’s out of season or stock, frozen is a good choice.  Check out my blog from last week, I’ve got a link to you local farmer’s markets.  Food stores are stocking more and more varieties of greens.

Questions on how to buy and cook up some delicious greens? Contact me to set up a session in person, online or  by phone. Eating a healthy diet can be easier and more delicious than you think.  Check out these links below for some more great ideas on how to find your perfect greens!

Cheers!

https://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/diet-tips/10-best-leafy-greens

http://www.besthealthmag.ca/best-eats/healthy-eating/6-health-benefits-of-leafy-greens/

https://www.nutrition-and-you.com/collard-greens.html

 

*Disclaimer-This information is solely for informational purposes.  IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE.  Kim Gerhardt, Certified Health Coach, does not take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of  medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information.  The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.

 

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Let’s Get Cookin! Fresh foods at the farmer’ markets! 4-11-18

Posted by on Apr 11, 2018 in Health Blog | 0 comments

Let’s Get Cookin! Fresh foods at the farmer’ markets!  4-11-18

It’s spring!  Time to let go of winter’s heavy clothes and foods!  We are beginning to see the fresh veggies of spring in many of our local food stores. There are even a few farmer’s markets beginning to open up or may be all year round!

As a Certified Health and Wellness Coach and Personal Fitness Chef, I am always on the lookout for the freshest foods I can find.  As a vegetarian fitness chef, that means fruits and veggies, whole grains and some dairy including local cheeses and butter.

Here’s a link to help you get started.  It will give you the local farmer’s markets, if any, in your area.

https://www.localharvest.org/farmers-markets/

Start off with Farmer’s Market 101.  Buy it when you see it.  If you’ve found your fave veg or fruit, grab it when you can  Then move on and try something new!  I always look for organic and the vendor will be happy to comply yay or nay.  I buy my fresh veggies for 3-4 days at a time.   Be sure to check for any nicks, bruising or rotten spots.  I find a list is a good way to stay on track, most of the time, when buying at a Farmer’s Market.  There can be veggie/fruit overload and the foods you came to purchase may not be a consideration.

Now that you’ve got your bounty, be sure to clean it and prepare it for the days ahead.  I do not peel most veggies as many of the nutrients are in the skin.  Fresh asparagus and baby carrots are delicious roasted with a splash of olive oil and a sprinkle of salt and pepper!  Peas taste great blanched in salted water, if you can eat salt, for a few minutes. Baby greens need a quick rinse and drizzle of olive oil and balsamic vinegar.

So many fresh, delicious choices at the farmer’s market.  I hope yours is open for business!  🙂

Can’t find a local farmer’s market?  If you’re lucky like me to have a local farm store, check out the seasonal varieties of fruits and veggies.  If not, get to know the produce delivery and manager of your local food store. Many larger stores are upping their fresh produce game to attract more customers.  Take advantage of specials when you can.  If all else fails and you can’t find fresh produce, frozen is second best.  Most frozen foods are frozen at the peak of ripeness and many companies have expanded their veggie and fruit choices.

If you would like to learn how to make healthier food choices, click Contact Me to sign up for my pantry makeover/smart shopping sessions.  It’s a great way to see what you are eating now and begin to incorporate healthier choices.  As I like to say, “fresh is best”!  🙂

 

*Disclaimer:

This information is solely for informational purposes.  IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE.  Kim Gerhardt, Certified Health Coach, does not take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of  medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information.  The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.

Read More